SciAm :: Womens Risk of Reproductive Disease Linked to Environmental Estrogens

Womens Risk of Reproductive Disease Linked to Environmental Estrogens: Scientific American.

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The Plant Kingdom’s Most Unusual Talents [Slide Show]: Scientific American

 

Well, it’s been a while since I’ve posted anything about plants (never-ish maybe), so here’s a bit of a showcase on the skills of a group of organisms that we normally see as stationary!

 

The Plant Kingdom’s Most Unusual Talents [Slide Show]: Scientific American.

 

The bright leaves of the venus flytrap (Dionae...

The bright leaves of the venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) attract insects in the same way as flowers. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Explore the Human Microbiome [Interactive]: Scientific American

Let’s start off our week by exploring our bodies, shall we? No, I’m not about to start a Sex Ed course (even though that could get hilarious). Scientific American is offering us a chance to become familiar with the micro-organisms that inhabit our bodies.

Explore the Human Microbiome [Interactive]: Scientific American.

 The body contains 10 times more bacteria, fungi and other micro-organisms than human cells. Most of these species are harmless—although they can still cause illness if they wind up in the wrong place. In addition, researchers are beginning to learn exactly how some microbial species in the body help digestion and contribute to regulation of appetite and the immune system.

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SciAm :: 3-D Microscopy Casts Blood Vessel’s Structure in New Light

3-D Microscopy Casts Blood Vessel’s Structure in New Light: Scientific American Gallery.

Using confocal microscopy, which had been used for years to observe protein distribution in a cell, scientists have now seen the structure of proteins between cells.

To create the image above, Meininger and his colleague Michael Hill used fluorescent tags to label different components of an arteriole wall; cells are labeled in green, whereas elastin—a stretchy protein that holds the vascular cells together—is labeled in red. By taking a series of images with a confocal microscope, which relies on point illumination to eliminate out-of-focus areas, the researchers were able to construct a 3-D view of the blood vessel’s architecture.